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Autism and the Teenager March 17, 2015

Posted by hopeauthority in Autism, autism activities, autism diet, autism teen, humor, Parenting, special needs, specific carbohydrate diet.
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He turned 13 this week. A teenager now.

Oh My God. How did this happen?

On one hand, I feel like it was yesterday when he was born, then diagnosed at almost 2. Maybe the fact that his autism had us locked into the “terrible twos” for ten years has something to do with my disbelief that my little man is now a teen. Yet on the other hand, I feel like I’m 102 and I can’t remember life before autism.

I had to laugh at all the Facebook friends who saw the birthday post that I have a teen… and started warning me to go out and buy hair color now. Hello? “Now”? “Now”, you say? Where have you been? Honey, I’ve been Clairol’s best customer for this whole 11 year ride. (Of course, I’ve been known to sport that gray “skunk stripe” more times than I’d like to recall when I didn’t have the time to get to the salon.)

Anyway, autism has grayed me, and aged me. And the teenage years to come scare me.

The hormones kicked in about a year ago, along with the teenage angst and the mustache. How is it that the kid has a mustache at 12 anyway? Seventh grade seems young to me for that. My boy. He is so gorgeous with his green eyes, slim build, long hair and ready smile. He could model…if only he could sit still and focus long enough.

I worry about his attraction to girls and their attraction to him. I see heartbreak and frustration coming. He isn’t “typical” enough for a relationship yet. Maybe someday. But he desperately wants to make connections and is trying so hard, though he lacks the conversational skills. His life-long desire to hug everyone, once cute, is getting awkward now as he grows to an already 5’4′ tall. Language is the one thing, no, the biggest thing, that prevents him from the breakthrough we all feel is right on the other side of that invisible wall.

He’s come so far though. I never thought he’d talk when he was first diagnosed. And while I can’t really yet imagine it, I am hopeful he will live a somewhat independent life someday. He takes dance and piano and acting lessons. He plays basketball, baseball and lacrosse on special needs teams. And in one of the greatest feats ever: He sang a two minute song…Do you Hear the People Sing from Les Miserables!…all alone with only an instrumental accompaniment while competing in a suit and tie in a local pageant on the stage of a large community theater. Massive accomplishment. Yet, he can’t hold a conversation.

You know what? Conversation is overrated. Today is a day to celebrate how far my wonderful teenager has come. And how bright his future will be. How bright all their futures will be.

* * * * * * * * * * *** * * * *

Brag on: What has your child accomplished that you never thought he/she would? Or what do you fear your child will never accomplish?

Finding Time to Blog on Autism May 21, 2013

Posted by hopeauthority in Autism, autism diet, Children, humor, Parenting, special education, special needs, specific carbohydrate diet.
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your-are-late

Oh. My. God.

I am so sorry… and so stoked… at the same time.

I don’t have to tell you why I fell off the blog bandwagon because you “get it”. Autism gets in the way of so many things. Including blogging.

Days fly by. Then weeks and years follow. And before you know it, your little “Fabio” is 11 and ready to graduate fifth grade and go to Middle School next year.  I simply can’t believe the time has passed. And yet I look so young. Not!

I’m not sure if any of my original followers are still out there, but I’d love to hear if you are and to catch up on how your not-so-little ones are doing!

The good news is that I’ve tried many new things for my little man and will be able to share that all with you. He is still on the SCD (Specific Carbohydrate Diet) and that’s 8 years now! I never thought I could keep up this maniacal pace of cooking and baking everything he eats for so long now. But I have. With the popularity of Paleo and Primal diets, SCD is easier than ever as many of those recipes fit SCD or can easily be adapted to comply.

I am looking forward to being here more often. You see, I blog for a living for some really wonderful doctors (part of what makes it hard to blog for pleasure). But here, I only have you guys to answer to, and I don’t have to weigh Every. Single. Word. I can just let it spill from the heart. Or from the gut. Whatever it happens to be that day. Uncensored “stim talk”.

Before I dive in, are there any questions? Any issues you’re having I can help with?

I can’t wait to start sharing all the funny things, the inspiring things, the ugly things…come on, it’s real autism here not the sugar-coated version. Also, there are the therapies like NAET, Braincore and HBOT. And the school and extracurricular stories. And the cursing…

Puberty is coming. Lord, help me.

It’ll be a blast. I promise.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * ***

Who are you? Tell me about your little one.

 

Autism Diet Challenge: Just Try It! March 1, 2010

Posted by hopeauthority in Autism, autism diet, Children, Health, Parenting, specific carbohydrate diet.
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Right off the bat I want to warn you that I am sticking my neck out here in an effort to save the world, instead of  just worrying about helping my own son. And I’m sure someone is going to make me regret that I did, but I’m going for it so I can sleep at night…

Ok. I try to be open-minded, and I love a good debate. And I really try to be respectful of other people’s opinions when they differ from mine.

But if I’m being truly honest with myself, I need to face this one pet peeve I have that sort of deviates from what I just said.

I can’t for the life of me understand why parents won’t at least TRY an autism diet to see if it would help their child!

Let’s examine some top reasons why people won’t try it:

1. There’s no proof it works, and recently, there have been reports that say it doesn’t.

To that I say: Not everything, especially something like the implementation of a diet and it’s affect on behavior, can be adequately tested in a study. Is there anyone out there who wouldn’t trust their own gut and eyes over a medical report? Let’s not forget how many decades the government and medical establishment let us go on thinking cigarettes weren’t harmful…

2. It’s too expensive.

Yes, it is more expensive in the sense that you will spend more money on food for a special diet than a mainstream diet… unless of course your regular diet is one of take-out food. But, if your child felt better and behaved better, wouldn’t that be worth the cost? Maybe you’d offset the diet’s cost with the money you might save on other treatments that may now not be needed.

3. It’s too hard to do.

It is hard, at first. And at times, like parties and holidays. But parties and holidays with a wild child are hard too. What if the diet helped your child and you and he could enjoy the party for a change? In time, the diet  just becomes a part of life and that’s how you’d have to look at it. Look at it as a lifestyle choice, not a diet. Otherwise, like all diets, it’ll be doomed to fail. 

4. I can’t imagine “doing this to him” for his whole life!

First of all, take small steps. Tell yourself you’ll just give it a real try for 30 days. And then give it a real, honest try. Even when it’s difficult. And it will be hard at first…especially if it is working! No cheating. You will know in 30 days if there’s some noticeable improvement in your child. And when you see that change, that is where the strength to continue the diet comes from. And support groups online. For me, I saw improvements in my son within 2 weeks, but it took about 18 months on the diet before his gut healed enough that he finally had a formed stool…just days before his scheduled colonoscopy and endoscopy, thank God.

In my son’s case, we were fortunate enough to have very specialized labwork done through an autism study he was involved in (lab work you can’t just order from a local lab) and we KNOW he has some mutations and can not digest the proteins in certain foods. In fact, his body breaks them down into harmful opiates, which, when released into the bloodstream, travel to the brain and contribute to the autistic behaviors. For me, feeding him the typical American diet is like feeding him poison. What if your child has that kind of mutation, but you don’t know it?

5. He won’t eat that food. He’s picky.

Okay, who is the parent here? This is the time to get tough.  And the earlier you implement a diet, the easier it is to do. My son was just turning 3 and you have more control at a younger age. Plus the diet will be well established by the time he starts school and he won’t even remember McDonald’s nuggets, so he won’t long for them, though he may be curious about them.

Think of those processed foods as the enemy. Most kids are picky eaters. It’s in your hands whether you are going to let your kid’s chosen 4 favorites be healthy ones or not. If you stick to your guns, your child will eventually give in since his survival instinct will make him eat this way if that’s all you offer. Plus, some kids are actually addicted to foods their bodies are craving because bacteria in their guts need those foods to live. If that’s the case in your child, you need to break that cycle by depriving the bacteria from feeding. You do that by eating differently. You starve the bacteria and they die. And the gut heals.

6. It’s not healthy.

Come on. How balanced do you think the typical American diet of chicken nuggets, hot dogs and pizza is? With so many children becoming obese and diabetic, these diets are actually a gift of health that you can give to your child.

Even adults would do well on this diet. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet that my son is on has been helping celiacs, Crohns and IBS patients for over 50 years. Have you noticed how middle aged folks are suddenly unable to tolerate dairy or gluten? I’ve been told it’s because our bodies haven’t evolved fast enough to keep up with the processing of the foods we eat today. We so-called healthy people can’t break down these chemically-processed foods. How can our children then?

Under the supervision of a medical professional and with the proper nutritional supplementation if needed, these diets can resolve intestinal and digestive problems that you may not even realize your child is suffering from. Don’t you want to feed your child a diet that makes him or her feel their best?

7. My child doesn’t have any food allergies or sensitivites so he doesn’t need the diet.

Maybe. Maybe not. A doctor can give a diagnosis. But a mother’s instinct says a lot, too… if she knows what to look for. Does your child have any of the red flag signs of an allergy or sensitivity…such as red cheeks, skin rashes/eczema, dark or reddish circles under their eyes? Maybe constipation or diahhrea? Does he eat certain few foods to the exclusion of most others…almost like an addict? Can’t sleep at night?

8. I don’t know where to start.

First, find a doctor who supports autism diets. A recommendation from a friend is best, but failing that, look for a DAN (Defeat Autism Now) doctor or chiropractor. Allergists and immunologists with autism practices may be able to help you. Some, but few, pediatricians may too. Be sure they have experience with autism diets.

Do some research. There’s a few different diets out there. The best one (in my opinion only) is the Specific Carbohydrate Diet  my son has been on for 5 years and you can learn all about it by reading the fascinating book Breaking the Vicious Cycle by Elaine Gottschall. SCD is like GF/CF to the extreme since it allows no grain at all and my challenge is to try this diet for 30 days if you think you can handle it! (For more info, see the Autism Diet Help tab in this blog). But there’s also regular GF/CF (gluten free/casein free) diets and the Feingold Diet.

****I’ve always been an advocate of therapies that may improve the lives of our autistic children …so long as they do not have the potential for harm. These diets are healthy ways of eating for anyone. There is no harm if a doctor is on board with any nutritional supplementation. It may not make any difference in your child’s behavior, but it won’t hurt him or you to try it. 

But what if it helps him? What if it even recovers him?

Can you live with yourself if you didn’t take that chance? It could be the simplest of answers. Just 30 days to see if it may help. You don’t need Jenny McCarthy or me to tell you. You will know if it’s helping. And if it’s not, go off it with the peace of mind of knowing you gave it a real try, instead of living with the nagging wonder if you should do it.

By April 1st, those persistent red cheeks and shiners could be gone. Maybe even some language. Please trust me and just try it. And come back and let me know how it went!

What has your experience been with autism diets? I want the good, the bad, and the ugly…

Autism and the School Play February 18, 2010

Posted by hopeauthority in Autism, Children, Parenting, school, special education, special needs, specific carbohydrate diet, Uncategorized.
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“He’s going to be a horse.”

The note came home from his second grade teacher. The play he’s been working so hard for since October in his mainstream Music class was rapidly approaching.

A HORSE??

What the heck kind of play is this? Is it all horses? Is the horse a central character? And most importantly…can the show go on if the horse runs away?!

The note continues. “Must wear solid black, brown, or tan. A headpiece will be provided.”

HEADPIECE?!

You’re freakin kidding, right? Ok. Now, I’m starting to sweat. What kind of headpiece are we talkin about here? Doesn’t matter. I don’t see him even trying it on, much less wearing it for a 30 minute production.

Thirty minutes?

What are the odds of Fabio and his one other autistic classmate making it through this mainstream version of “The Tortoise and the Hare”…with about 35 other “typical” second graders?

Thirty minutes of standing in place on risers, many musical numbers with hand and arm gestures, taking turns, NOT running away, even in the face of all those parents and grandparents and their camcorders…and all the noise.

To date, Fabio has had bad experiences with stages. Graduation from his special needs program right before kindergarten didn’t go well. He was miserable, wouldn’t wear the cap, and was melting in the gown. And he refused to go up for his diploma. One of only 3 kids who wouldn’t. Ditto in two award ceremonies for reading since then.

But time has passed since those events. And Fabio has also had a chance to see his sister perform in several concerts and live theater productions in the community. He goes to the shows, sits nicely, and gives her flowers at the end. And he loves music. Maybe this would be different.

I figured I’d better prepare him in advance for the idea that we’d be coming to see this play. So a few days beforehand, while he and I were laying in my bed relaxing before bedtime,  I said in my happy but not too excited voice, “Mommy and Daddy can’t wait to come and see you be a horse in the show.”

“No.”

“Well, um, yes, honey. We are going to come see you just like the other mommies and daddies of your friends. Ok?”

“No.”

Time for a new approach. “Honey, Mommy and Daddy want to come see you just like we come see Nic (Sister) in her shows. We are so happy and proud of you and want to come see your play. And we’ll bring you a present.”

I see the wheels turning as he considers this. I brace myself for the request. Surely he’ll ask for some costly toy…

“Bring flowers.”

Did I hear that right? Flowers? For a school production? For a boy? Well, why the hell not! You got it, bud. And I secretly applauded his connection between his play and his sister’s plays and the ritual of giving flowers.

So we grabbed the camcorder, special treats for the after-party that he could eat on his diet, and of course, the freakin flowers, and we hurried off into the snowy morning traffic to get good seats for whatever was in store for us. And we waited. All the “typical” kids came in and took their places. All the kids in the classes of those kids came in and took their places.  All those kids’ parents and grandparents came in and took their places.

Where is he?

Then, bringing up the rear… like a cowboy hearding cattle… marched my “horse” with the horse headband on! He went right to his spot on the riser. The music began.

He was perfect. PERFECT. He was typical. In fact, he was better than typical. No one there would ever have guessed that he or his classmate beside him had autism.

I started to cry. My husband started to cry. His teachers and aides started to cry. His former teachers who came out in the snow from other schools and from maternity leave just to see him…started to cry. And for about 30 minutes we all watched in awe as he did every single thing just right. And he radiated happiness. The little black horse with the headpiece on his head.

And when it was over and the tears were dried, that little horse rode off into the hallway… carrying flowers like a champion.

Regression by Strawberry May 2, 2009

Posted by hopeauthority in Autism, autism diet, Children, Health, school, specific carbohydrate diet.
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Gotta love those care-free days of youth and all the fun school projects you do in special ed first grade. You’ve got the non-edible projects with macaroni and glue. And, occasionally, you get the edible ones.

And when your kid is on a totally restrictive special diet from hell , these projects are the ones that make you want to kill somebody. Or kill yourself. Oh, and it’s extra special when you get only one night’s notice about the project…

So the note comes home:

We’re going to be making peanut butter and jelly sandwiches in class tomorrow. Can you send something in so that Fabio can participate?

Unlike the hundred of thousands of kids who’d die from it, it’s not the peanut butter that’s a problem for Fabio.  I have a special organic peanut butter with no additives that he loves.

And it’s not the bread. I make Fabio bread from cashew butter, eggs, baking powder and a pinch of sea salt. 

It’s the freakin jam/jelly that is the challenge.

I’ve been canning jams and jellies for competition for almost 20 years, so thankfully, I have a leg up on most folks in that area. And I can substitute honey for sugar in the recipes. The trouble is the fruit options.

Fabio can eat many fruits, but not the ones that make popular jams. He can’t tolerate berries, grapes, or apples due to their high natural salicylates and/or phenols. And what’s worse is…he loves them. If you put out a bowl of blueberries and a cake, he’d go for the berries every time.

When he eats these fruits, he is in heaven. Until the next day. And the five to ten days thereafter. Yes, you heard me. The effects far outlast how long the food was in his body.

It’s like a Jeckyl and Hyde thing.

He regresses across the board. Total loss of eye contact and any functional language. Very bad behaviors. Repeated tantrums. And it goes on for days! Of course, it’s never worth the moment of pure joy he had while eating the coveted fruit. And yet again…

Still, every 6-12 months a situation will arise when the temptation is too great. When heroic efforts would be needed to avoid the fruit. When just enough time has elapsed since the last time to let me forget how hard those several days of hell are going to be on all of us.

When you think that maybe… just maybe… this time it will be different because maybe… just maybe… he somehow outgrew this allergy.

So I stay up til 2 am making this gorgeous, ruby-red strawberry jam for my little man. And I bake him a fresh loaf of his bread and slice it a bit thicker so he’ll be able to spread on it without ripping. And I packed a little container of his peanut butter. And I crossed my fingers.

Sleepyhead walks in to the kitchen at 7am, sees the jam in his lunchbox, removes the container, and says very nonchalantly: “No thank you.”

Umm… No freakin way!!! I thought. And… with the look of daggers coming from my tired eyes as I replaced the container in the lunchbox… I said through gritted  smiling teeth:

“Mommy made you yummy jelly to make peanut butter and jelly sandwiches today at school.”

“No thanks.”  As he removes it again.

Okay, this is going nowhere. So, I give him a tiny taste. And in one instant a memory awakened inside him. And his green eyes widened. And he smiled. Big.

So he happily went off to school with the promise of more jam in his future. And I met him up there later to give him some enzymes to help him digest the berries. And he came home begging for more PB&J sandwiches…which I gave him… until the small allotted amount of jam was gone. And he was in heaven.

Until the next day when regression set in.

But I’m happy to say that it is less severe than it’s been in the past. He has more language now and has retained it. Eye contact is okay for the most part. The bad behaviors are only evident when demands are placed on him that he doesn’t want to do and even then, not as bad as before.

It gives me hope that my boy will someday be able to enjoy the simple pleasures in life.

Like fresh strawberries in the summer.

And maybe a friend to share them with.

Autism Birthday Party From Hell December 4, 2008

Posted by hopeauthority in Autism, autism diet, Children, Parenting, school, special needs, specific carbohydrate diet.
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About two weeks ago, my son went to the best birthday party ever. Last night, he went to the worst birthday party ever. Ever. Um, did I happen to mention EVER?

Warning: This post is a rant.

I wasn’t going to let him go because it was so inconvenient to work it out for 4:45 on a weeknight, but I felt guilty since it was a boy from his class.  I don’t know the mom, having only met her once…at open school night. I should add that she has a reputation for being very openly anti-school district and has a lawsuit pending over her son’s placement.

I didn’t want my son to miss a chance to have a social outing with his peers, especially at this cool, new indoor inflatables place I’d heard great things about.  So I moved heaven and earth, called in favors, and got to the party…only to find that only one other boy from the class came. But there were plenty of other special needs kids there who were noticeably older and larger than my son. That’s great, I thought. A nice group of like-minded parents.

Boy was I wrong! I never felt so unwelcome and out of place at a party in my life. And as we all know, there are many parties where we can feel out of place. I was wrong to assume that a special needs party would be a safe haven.

So, imagine a giant inflatable double slide reaching right up to the ceiling…about 20 feet high… and having a narrow “staircase” sandwiched between the two slides, which is actually more like a 24 inch wide path with vinyl-covered, built-in 2×4’s as “steps” and durable straps on each side as “railings” to pull yourself up with.

Now, imagine … cajoling your painfully shy and anxious son to try something… ANYTHING… out of the five different inflatable options… sometime before the freakin party is over…  Then, having to coax him and follow him up said staircase from hell without looking like a total doofus and then sliding down it with his little butt crammed ever so snugly in your crotch. Now repeat. Four times. Finally, courage emerges and he goes solo. Life is good.

Enter, Little JackAss.

Out of nowhere, this huge boy of about 10, lunges up the staircase where my son …just behind his 2 friends… is about halfway up.  Little JackAss reaches ‘C’ and doesn’t push past him as I was expecting. Oh, no. Instead, he proceeds to violently push and shove ‘C’ down the staircase! ‘C’ is telling him “Stop that!”, and is holding on to the straps for dear life and looking down to me.

In an instant that felt like an hour and in what I imagine as one of those slow motion movie scenes, I leapt…yes, I can apparently leap when need be… to his defense and was on Little JackAss in a flash, bellowing for him to “Get your hands off of him!” I remember thinking all the while, Where the hell is this kid’s mother?!  Then, from somewhere down below comes the shrill, loud voice of Mother JackAss “Timothy! Keep going up. Right now. You go up. Go!”

Are you friggin kidding me?! That was all? No “Timothy, don’t do that”? No “Timmy, say you’re sorry to that boy”‘? Not even a Mother Jackass-to-Mother  “I’m sorry”? Nope…not a peep.  He made another kid cry 2 minutes later. Same lack of response from  Mother Jackass.

Then as soon as my heart rate went back to normal and I was able to convince my son that it was safe to try the slide again, Party Hostess Mom (who is one of those moms who puts herself before her kid: painted face, big 80’s hair, gym rat) comes over and her first words EVER of conversation to me are (add major negative attitude to the tone): “So, are you happy with how things are this year?” Ever the diplomat, I say that there’s stuff I like and some stuff I don’t.  She actually scoffed at my answer.  (I thought scoffing went out of style with the colonies…)  She can’t let it rest…she proceeds to interrogate me as to why ‘C’ doesn’t have home hours (“the district lies about it only being for academics”), and “Oh, he can talk?” and “Oh, he has extracurricular activities?” Finally, I had been pushed to the point of saying, “Look you don’t even know my son at all. He’s doing very well and we’re happy with his placement and his social activities.” So she walks off in her skin tight gym suit, clearly unsatisfied.

The last offense comes in the party room. Due to ‘C’s special diet, I made him chicken fingers and watermelon and a bottle of water and 2 special cupcakes to replace the pizza and soda and ice-cream cake being served. I’d give my right arm if he could eat those things, but sadly he can’t.

When I took out his food, all eyes were on us like I’d committed some grievious offense. Like I thought he was too good for pizza or something. It was so uncomfortable. We moved on to the cupcake faster than I’d planned just to keep peace and when I took it out, the Hostess Mom asks if its GF. So…thinking she really cared… I briefly explained that it was and it was also CF, SF and grain free and that ‘C’ had some serious dietary issues and unfortunately can’t eat anything that I don’t make from scratch. Up goes the painted-on eyebrow…

Instead of understanding, she says…again with the attitude…”Oh, I thought about doing the GF diet, but I really don’t think it works. Do you really think it works?” Now, these words…without an attitude… are welcome to me as I am happy to explain the diet and how its helped ‘C’ so much over the almost 4 years he’s been on it to anyone who really wants the info.

But when the query is not a positive and genuine request for information, but rather merely a venomous comment from a selfish and ignorant woman… who just got on my last nerve… my attitude changes…

“Well, SINCE YOU ASKED, yes I KNOW its worked for ‘C’ . He continues to make great strides and is so much healthier than he used to be. He sleeps well at night and can pay attention at school.  The diet is not for every child, of course. But… SINCE YOU ASKED… I am SURE it’d help ‘D’. By the look of his red cheeks and dark eye circles, he most definately has a food allergy.”

ZING!  Now go home and sleep with that guilt.

Sorry, I just had to rant. I can handle anyone who is honestly trying their best to help their child. I never preach to people about the diet or any other therapies we’ve tried with ‘C’, and only give advice when asked. Even when I believe strongly that a child looks or behaves like they may have a food allergy, I bite my tongue. I like to think that we all try to make the best decisions for our children.

My only gripe is with the people who put themselves and their needs before their children…especially the loud mouth ones who always have excuses not to try something that may benefit their child and who always blame everyone and everything else for why their child is not progressing.

And a sad note to close on was near the end of the party, when the birthday boy sat next to me and touched my face (touching people’s faces is a stim of his). I turned to him and said warmly and with a big smile “Hey, ‘D’, are you having fun at your birthday party. ‘C’ had a great time!” He smiled back at me. Then I look up at the woman standing on the other side of him (not his mom) and, looking at me like I am a child molester, she asks meanly right in front of  the birthday boy “Do you really think he even knows who you are? How does he know you ?”

Again amazed, I said “Well, yes, I do think he knows who I am. My son is in his class and I was just at the Thanksgiving feast in the classroom last week. So, yes I do think he remembers me.” And I looked back to ‘D’ with a smile. And he touched my face again.

Sometimes, there’s just too many JackAsses in the world.

Green M&Ms Make Me…Angry September 19, 2008

Posted by hopeauthority in Autism, autism diet, Health, specific carbohydrate diet, Uncategorized.
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Argh! Another dietary infraction at school. It seems ‘C’ got an M&M…from the floor, no less! And here’s the ironic thing… when the school nurse called my cell to tell me about it, I was eating breakfast with some of the moms from his class. And one of them sent in M&Ms that morning.

This mom is a new friend of mine. A few of us formed a breakfast club of sorts, meeting for french toast, bacon and support every Thursday morning at the diner. (Don’t know why we didn’t start this club up last year, but I guess we just had to get used to our own transitions to kindergarten.)

These women are already so important to me. We not only have parenting an autistic child in common, but our kids share the same teacher. Our shared experiences really empower us. We are becoming our own little “force” to be reckoned with. A little like “Don’t mess with the kids in class 1-5”. Wait til we join the SEPTA team next week!

So, the M&M thing really set me off… especially coming right on the heels of the “raisin incident”. And mostly because it set ‘C’ off–literally. It had chocolate, dairy, sugars, and artificial color/dye, just to name a few of the offensive parts. Who wouldn’t want one? Especially a little boy. Or the little girl who was the intended recipient of the candy.  In fact, I know several people who can’t push themselves away from a bowl of them. (Of course, they are my husband’s family and that’s a whole other post…)

So ‘C’ is not his usual self now. And how long that will last remains to be seen. (Bananas do him in for 10 days.) The regular ‘C’ is gone… replaced by a boy who waffles between maniacal laughter and bouts of sudden crying and sadness. He squeeks out “feel better”, but can’t tell me what hurts. His verbals are down.  He peed a little in his pants because he is not as focused. He peed a little in the tub for the first time in his life.  He’s even limping a little, but he didn’t injure himself. And so we wait…

So I’m mad about it all. Not at my friend. After all, she sent them in as a reinforcer to motivate her child. If ‘C’ didn’t have these diet issues, I can’t say I wouldn’t have sent them in for him, too. Though I do wish the kids, who are all advanced enough in age and skill, would all just move on to non-edible reinforcers, like stickers, playgound or computer time, or something similar and a little more toward mainstreaming. No one would argue that most kids would be better off without candy-especially in the morning.  (Of course I’ve always been put off by the food reinforcers, even when used on ‘C’ as a toddler. They always made me feel like ABA was dog-training. “Do this trick, and here’s your treat”)…

I am mad ‘C’ can’t have M&Ms. I’m mad other kids can–and do–in front of him. I’m mad that they are always at my husband’s family’s functions. I’m even mad at myself for eating them when ‘C’ is not around.

So, I guess green M&Ms make me mad. And to all of you out there with your minds in the gutter… they certainly don’t make me horny. What’s that  anyway?  Anyone remember?